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bank of america and wells fargo and u.s. bancorp endlessly on any dip over and over again. that's why i bought them for my charitable trust. i knew they had to come in. they could take all they wanted and they're doing it. oil and natural gas, down last week. what a chance to get in. even though the earnings were widely lambasted. you see, they had no choice. the big-shot money managers simply cannot catch a double-digit move from the sidelines. they can no longer hope that the market will come down because it's up too darn much. and most of them don't have the luxury of being up so much that they can leave the table. they're being forced back to the table where they have to place bets whenever any discount whatsoever occurs. and they know where they won't move the stocks with their aggressive buying. think back to bank of america, think wells fargo. oh, that's selling? they've got to hone every share they have. they can't afford to sell anything, they'll lose their exposure. they have too much buying to do here's the bottom line -- we are in self-fulfilling mode now. that's why i keep
priority and yes, i have read the bill. >> -- taxes. >> please don't yell out, this is america, this is memphis, tennessee, take two aspirin and come back in the morning. >> reporter: boos and cheers greeted ed perlmutter. proof people are passionate when it comes to health care reform. >> i just appreciate the fact that you're all willing to take time to come out. thank you for exercising your civic duty of talking to your congressman. >> scenes like that playing out all over america. and it's not only the crowds losing their cool at these town hall shout downs. listen to georgia congressman david scott get fired up when the topic came up at a town hall meeting just last week. >> not a single one of you had the decency to call my office and set up for a meeting. okay. then do that! do that! but don't -- don't come and take advantage of what these individuals have done. you want a meeting with me on health care, i'll give it to you. >> well, next hour, we'll tell you why that may not exactly be true in this case and show you much more on this very heated exchange. much, much mo
of a better america immersed from woodstock. he writes woodstock means little until you place it in the larger context of the society unravelling around the young adults. from their parents generation, they had absorbed rich idealism for social and economic justice. the piece by brett green and author in denver goes on to say, it was an interlude arriving in the context of more social and political upheaval than most americans have witnessed. it was a chaotic but peaceful interlude to a forthcoming breakdown between government and the governed when combined, it would end an unpopular war. i want to talk for the first half-hour, your thoughts, did a better america emerge from woodstock. the numbers ... twitter address is cspanwj. if you have called us in the last 30 days, send your comment via e-mail or twitter and give others a chance. >> what was it about the gathering, this carnival, this music festival that influenced your political evolution and did a better america emerge from woodstock? more from the denver post piece, a better america emerged from wood stot by brett green. he wrote it w
. the book is called the last best hope restoring conservatism and america's promise. i am pleased to have him back at this table. welcome. >> sorry you had to bring me. >> i enjoy hearing the stories about the ball girl last time here. (laughter) >> rose: how are you different today? >> you know, i think -- i think i know now in 2009 what i didn't know in 1995. >> rose: i hope so. >> and ironically, i'm counselling my liberal democratic friends, saying just relax. you know, i thought 1995 when we conservatives took over congress, we owned the world. that we could pass whatever we wanted to pass through the house. the senate would confirm it. it would go to the white house, be signed and it would be law. and what i found out was james madison was a pretty smart guy. we darted further right than america was ready to go. and you had moderate republicans and democrats in the senate. it sort of chiseled off the edges of that agenda. the same thing's happening now. and democrats have gone too far left. they spent too much money. they're moving faster than the middle of american political though
," broadcast on pbs in america and around the globe. my name is mike embley. coming up later for you -- china expresses its strong opposition. it does not like tie 1's invitation to the dollar llama. and he sailed around the road, but he is not old enough to drive. a british teenager complete the voyage. -- and he sailed around the world, but he is not old enough to drive. hello to you. bbc has discovered many cases of corruption involving iraqi security forces. the police and army are widely blamed for failing to stop the current wave of bombings. there is concern that there is endemic corruption undermining their efforts. two months ago, they took over responsibility for security in iraq as american troops pulled back. the life-and-death question now -- can they prove they are up to the job? we have this report from andrew north. >> the attack on the foreign ministry. a suicide bomber last week. seconds before it detonated it right outside. the foreign minister tells us the iraqi army, police were partly responsible. >> the iraqi security forces should have done a better job because there w
reform in america. but the kind of comprehensive health care reform is what really is going to be the most important item. i hope that it is a bipartisan one that i think can be passed and energetically and have a great deal of support in the country. >> larry: elizabeth, can that happen without the government being involved in kind of a quasi insurance company of its own? >> can we get -- pass health care reform? we can pass health care reform without having -- what is commonly referred to as a public option. which means that to compete with your private insurers, united health care, cigna, blue cross/blue shield, you would have the federal government offering you the opening of insuring yourself through the government plan. i think it would be a huge mistake to pass anything -- any kind of reform without -- without that public option for a lot of reasons. one is that one of the things we want to do is make certain that we are striving to 46 million americans uninsured 25 million underinsured, a way of getting reliable transparent and cost-effective accessible -- cost acces
the celebration by singing god bless america and i hope you'll join them. . . the hope still lives and the dream shall never die. he had his sleeves and wakeful nights. he had his nightmares and yet he dreamt a dream that was trapped of the heart -- that was a draft of the heart and only his great heart could hold. he gave flesh to that the dream in the noble house of his thought where the sick were healed, the sphere broken, and the stranger welcomed. it is the age-old dream of the profits -- of the profitphets. there will be a bank would ge-- there will be a bank with yet -- there will be a banquet yet. the laugh, the sound of roses, the music -- may flights of angels sing thee to thy rest. ♪ ♪ dodd bless america -- god bless america ♪ landed that i love the ♪ stand beside her ♪ and the guide her ♪ through the night ♪ with the light from above ♪ from the mountain to the prairie ♪ to the ocean ♪ god bless america ♪ my home sweet home ♪ god bless america ♪ my home sweet home ♪ died bless america -- god bless america ♪ land that i love ♪ stand beside her ♪ and a
charged with trading them. 150 years since the start of america's oil rush. we're now in the place where it began. >> then natural gas that is being developed in this country at this point and time may get us to energy independence. >> years after britain declared war on hitler's germany, a new exhibition reveals what went on in winston churchill's secret underground bunker. >> it is 7:00 a.m. in washington, midday in london, and 1:00 p.m. in berlin. the israeli prime minister is meeting german chancellor merkel. the country's share a unique history. the trip includes various reminders of the holocaust. two issues are likely to dominate today's talks. the question of the settlements in the west bank, which germany opposes, and what to do about iran, which netanyahu describes as a threat to israel. >> this is the last leg of benjamin netanyahu's four-day tour. it follows talks in london, during which time hopes were raised that there could be agreements on settlements in the west bank. israel is said to be ready to restrict construction. it may not be the comprehensive freeze that the ame
and missiles and on the heels of news that three more americans are now being held in a country america does not have a diplomatic relationship with, iran. does this pump up one dictator and embolden others? we're joined now by pedavid gern and peter brooks. david, i want to start with you. it's almost impossible to ignore the message that it's sends to north korea and others that may be on shaky ground with the u.s. the next time they have u.s. citizens in their custody they can use them as bargaining chips to talk with high-level people, rewarding bad behavior. how do they keep that from happening? >> erica, i think this has a more important message to the world, and that is that america is a country that cares about its own, it will go to great lengths, a former president will fly around the world to bring back two innocent brave americans to reunite them with their families and that individuals matter in this country. and this situation, we didn't give anything away. it's not as if there was a bargain or a negotiation. rather, we had a brutal regime that captured these two young women. a
. i emphasize that they may not be representative of america. their views have to be taken into account. >> there is some disagreement. >> how are we supposed trust you? is there an option to say no to this bill? >> it is not about health care reform or insurance reform. it is about government control. >> i charge you with usurping authority not granted to you as a u.s. senator. >greta: houston, texas a councilwoman answers a cell phone while a cancer survivor asks her a question. >> if you're conscious allows you, what are you doing for america -- >> seriously, really. come on. [unintelligible] >> do you think this is good for america? when does it stop? greta: tracy asked that question and joins us live. was there any explanation by the congresswoman by what happened? >> i did talk to her later, but not about her using the phone. what appeared to be happening was her staff was telling her that there were local political leaders coming to the meeting that he -- that she should talk to. greta: did she pick up the phone in the middle of your question? do you know who she was
? or is it getting stuck in the bureaucratic mud? >>> one country's trash is another country's poison. america's discarded electronics are endangering the lives of these kids half a world away. and ron claiborne travels to africa on the trail of e-waste. >>> and money rehab. one woman, 300 pairs of jeans, 160 pairs of shoes. and she's not alone, we'll take you to where reckless spenders and she's not alone, we'll take you to where reckless spenders go to turn their lives around. captions paid for by abc, inc. >>> good morning, america. >> good morning, i'm just sending a tweet out. >> are you tweeting? >> right now! it is sunday, august 2nd. twitter's everywhere. it's everywhere. >> i thought we banned it from the set? >> no, i just sent your picture out. check it out, folks. 140 characters can it really get you into trouble? a lot of times we don't even think before we tweet but you really should because what you tweet could land you in court. one woman who slammed her landlord on twitter found out the hard way and she's being sued for defamation. we're going to get into this whole legal issu
. it was fought to make america be america for all its citizens. these were america's civil rights leaders. >> host: how would you describe this period in the 1950's to the young african-americans who only read about it through history books? and we should point out the year you were born, 1954. >> guest: exactly. what was interesting to me is i went on a book tour for "eyes on the prize" realizing how many people hadn't lived through this year, and this was of course than the late 80's and early 90's. so today it is overwhelming. most americans today, a quarter of the population are under 18. they have no concept. with a new is martin luther king is a hero or to be viewed as a hero, viewed positively although we get some younger people who think that he's just an image, they want a more militant figure. like malcolm x that would stand up, sort of the defiant black lace. then you get people who don't understand. they -- something like a colored blanking fountain, just bizarre or you get white kids who don't understand how recent so many of these indignities and limits in terms of education
future. i wanted this stopped. i don't want it 10 years from now. >> this is about america, remember that. >> i don't have insurance but i don't want health care either. >> yes, we will. >> no, you won't. >> talk to us that don't have health care. >> this is taking away our freedom of choice. the people said that we could have freedom of choice, where is our choice in this? >> a lot of passion although here we saw something that we have not seen before and that is a strong showing from the acorn folks. we have heard about conservative groups trying to get together to organize. our cameras got here after apparently witnesses tell me that acorn sent two busloads of people. one picture in lenticular, this was shown to me from a person who is a local person. -- one picture in particular. there is nothing illegal about that except that it upset the local population. this is a strongly conservative county, they showed up to voice their opinions and ask questions and they felt that they were disenfranchised and they were not able to get their opportunity to comment. they said that the union folk
of the difficulty of psychology of being black in america, he was the first person obviously to be on the court and understood right away that as he went through confirmation hearings and then just gone through confirmation hearings with briefing by to clarence thomas hearings and you think minorities and women very difficult and thurgood marshall's last three months and his intellect was question talked about was the smart to really be among the nation's legal elite and said there in judgment as a member of the court and when he gets on the court he really thought i must get the very best in terms of law clerks and assistance and what if the both of the idea that he could, in fact, handle this work and respond to the reasons assumptions. >> host: you also a great deal held this theory about how he was elected and also his conversations with lyndon johnson and doubt as to whether he felt it was clear to pick up the phone and call him. >> guest: i use that as the start of a book because in terms of building the narrative his experience in that moment tells you so much about the securities issues
and america'sha amased to have m back at this tle. welce. >> sorry you had to bring e. >> i joy hearing the stories out the ball gi la time here. (laughter) >> rose: w are you differt today? >> you kw, i think -- i think i know now in 2009 what i dn't know in 1995. > rose: i hope so. >> and ironically, i'm counselling my liberal democratic friends, sang just relax. you know, ihought 1995 en we conservatives took over coness, we owned the world. that w could pass atever we wanteto pass through the house. the senate would confirm it. it would go tohe white house, be signednd it would be l. and what i found out was james mason was a pret smart guy. we darted further right than amica was ready to go. and you ha moderat republicans and democts in the senate. it sort ofhiseled off the edges of tt agenda. the same thing's happening now. and docrats have goneoo far left. thespent too much money. they're movi faster th the middlef american political thought is ready to go. and there learning th same lesson. >>ose: are they doing that because it is their ideaologic place or are they doi that beca
on "america this morning," the new addition at the san diego zoo. >> let's sayhey already know the youngster has a good set of >> let's sayhey already know the youngster has a good set of lungs. ca help save a lot m of america up to 20% cash back from over 300 online retailers with our add it up program. just sign up and use your bank of america debit or credit card when .you shop online. it's one of the many ways we make saving money in tough times a whole lot easier. having to go in the iddle of traffic, and just starting nd stopping. having to go in the "middle of a ballgame and then not being able !to go once i got there., and going at night. i thought i had a goin problem. my doctor said i had a growing problem. it wasn't my bladder. my prostate was growing. i had an enlarging prostate that was causing my rinary symptoms., my doctor presribed avodart., (announcer) ver time, avodart actually, shrinks the prostate and improves urinary symptoms. so i can go more easil wheni need to go, and go less often. (announcer) ! avodart is for men only. due to risk of a specific birth defect. do not
best hope storing conservatism a america promise. am pleased to have him back at th table. lcome. >> sry you had to bring m >> i eny hearing the stories abt the ball girl lastime here. (laughter) >> rose: hoare you differentoday? >> you kno ihink -- i think i know now in 2009 what i did't know in 1995. >rose: i hope so. >> and ironically,'m counselling my liberal democratic friends, sayi just relax. you know, i tought 1995 wh we conservatives took over congrs, we owned the world. that we could pass whever we wanted pass through the house. he senate would confirm it. it would go to t white ouse, be signed ad it would be law and what iound out was james madion was a pretty smart guy. we darted further right than amera was ready to go. and you had moderate republicans and democra in the senate. it sort of cseled off the edges of tha agenda. the same thing'sappening now. and demrats have gone t far left. they ent too much money. they're movingaster than the middle omerican litical thought is ready to go. and they' learning the same lesson. >> re: are they doing that because it is th
their loans modified. lenders such as bank of america and wells fargo are called out for not doing enough. and ten lenders have not changed a single mortgage. >>> the s.e.c. is trying to ban a form of financial trading that benefits big wall street firms at the expense of average investors. so-called flash orders allow firms with high-powered computers to essentially peak at stock orders before they are placed. the practice has allowed those companies to rake in billions of dollars. >>> pepsico has struck a deal that will help it capitalize on changing trends. it's buying its two, main bottlers for $8 million. pepsi says it will allow the company to respond more quickly. >>> and procter & gamble can say it makes the official toilet tris of the national football league. they are announcing a sponsorship deal that allows the company to add a label to products, calling them the official locker room product of the nfl. >>> a new report might have parents of newborns crying right alongside their children. government estimates that a child born today will cost $290,000 by the time they finish h
are proud and happy that bank of america actually has a solution to help them out with their cards. i listen. that's the first thing i do is listen. you know what, what happened? what put you in this situation? and everyone's situation is different. we always want to make sure that we're doing what's best for our cardholders. i'll go through some of his monthly expenses, if he has a mortgage payment, if he pays rent. and then i'll use all that information to try and see what kind of a payment he financially can handle. i want to help you. bank of america wants to help you through this difficult time. when they come to you and they say thank you, aj, for helping me with this problem, that's where we get our joy from. that's what motivates us everyday. >>> the safe return of journalists euna lee and laura ling, former vice president gore this morning said laura's mother had some soup waiting for her. like any family meal, it's the family part that counts the most. for laura, it's her mother, father, husband, and sister, fellow journalist, lisa ling. >> proud would be an understatement. the lit
. this is a great book, singing in a strange land, the black church and the transformation of america. this is one of the great creatures in the history of american rhetoric. aretha franklin, arguably the greatest sound to emerge out of a human vocal cord, reverberating, vibrating, maybe the greatest sound made, some would say others. sam cooke, maybe sam cooke and aretha franklin. but everything franklin, ingenious was nurtured by her father, reverend franklin. i used to listen to this man every night in michigan. if you don't die before you get a chance to hear this man preach, you don't have -- the son sermon in the african-american tradition, of the greatest preachers ever. he ordained jesse jackson. he marched with martin luther king jr. in detroit, where king delivered arguably, even more impressive version of his i have a dream speech in detroit. got to show love to the home town, the crib. skip gates's book was here next to nelson george, where did our love go? nelson george is perhaps the most gifted african-american man of the letters of our time. what can't this guy do? he is a novelist
america's coastline? captions paid for by abc, inc. >>> and good morning to you again this morning. i'm diane sawyer in times square. robin is on assignment on this thursday, august 27th. and chris cuomo is anchoring our coverage from hyannisport, massachusetts. chris, good morning. any signs the family is stirring this morning? >> good morning, diane. i don't think i've ever been able to say this before, but the kennedy compound is quiet. and talking to family members, from youngest to oldest yesterday, they all remember teddy the same way. he was there for them always. and now, they are make sure they are there for him. the family is literally, taking shifts, holding vigil, over teddy's body, making sure the man who they love is never alone. even in the final moments, he showed his strength. >> there was a certain peace there that was absolutely beautiful. >> reporter: now, loved ones are gathering at the family compound to mourn and celebrate. >> that's what we're going to do in the next few days. celebrate his life, a wonderful life. >> reporter: a family who played in the surf wh
. this fall, and to the home to america's highest court, from the grand public places to those only accessible by the nine justices. the supreme court, coming the first sunday of october on c- span. >> president obama goes back on the road tomorrow to talk about health care. he will be in belgrade, montana, to talk about his plan to overhaul the nation's health- care system. on saturday, the first family plans to spend part of the day in yellowstone. afterward, president obama has to another forum in grand junction, colorado. white house officials have said that the trip is partly aimed at encouraging people to visit national parks, as well as to get out the message on health care. this morning, "washington journal" asked to be worse if the message is indeed getting out. we will show you as much as we can -- a view is if the message is indeed getting out. we will show you as much as we can. have the health care protests changed your mind? beginning with a call from sun city, fla. on the independent line. what is your thinking as an independent? caller: thanks for taking my call. it has changed
of house senators say they will vote. coming this fall, tour the home to america's highest court, "the supreme court." >> two journalist are right tom today. they were accompanied by president bill clinton who helped secure their release. they were for -- that were from al gore's current tv network. >> welcome home laura ling and euna lee. [applause] [inaudible] [inaudible] [inaudible] [inaudible] [laughter] >> 30 an hour seco -- 38 hours ago, euna lee and i were prisoners in north korea. we appeared at any moment that we could be sent to a hard labor camp. and then suddenly we were told that we were going to a meeting. we were taken to a location and when we walked in -- through the doors, we saw standing before us president bill clinton. we were shocked. but we knew instantly in our hearts that the nightmare of our life was finally coming to an end, and now we stand here and on and free -- home and free. euna and i would like to express our deepest gratitude to president clinton and his wonderful, amazing, not to mention supercool team, including john but as the -- podesta and the un
, and i hope you enjoy it. our members make up the most active and powerful union in america. today, we are in the battle of our lives as we push congress to enact real health care reform. we are using our union's power to counter some of the union lines that are spreading from coast-to-coast. we have spent roughly $1 million in the past month alone countering those lovely friends of america, the insurance companies. we are prepared to spend that much more in the months ahead. ouróy nurses are on tv with a powerful ad advocating for real health care reform. we have put organizers and staff into key congressional districts. we will not back down from this fight. america's working families are depending on us. this month, we are joining progressives in taking our message directly to members of congress with a nationwide highway to health care campaign, a rock-and-roll theme that is crisscrossing the country. nobody had better get in our way. stop by our booth and vigorous schedule. better yet, when the rv hitch your city, on board and blog about the energy you are seeing for healthcare r
is now president of the united states of america. [applause] our senators taking over from republicans. [applause] our good friend donna edwards has banned elected to her first full term in the house of representatives with many, many more to come. [applause] i have to tell you as someone who works with netroots nation every year, we had to be ready for the alternative. we had to have our other agenda in place in case the other actions turned out otherwise. some of the panel's we had in place. "no, we didn't." food policy and the mccain era. advocating the canadian immigration process. [laughter] taking your message to the people, billboards and skywriting changed elections. rob emanuel. meet the supreme court's first supreme court justice, alberto gonzales. reforming the vice-presidential selection process, how to find the village with the biggest idiot. [laughter] [applause] on behalf of our board, i can't say enough about our tremendous staff that works year-round to put this conference together. raven brooks, karen colbern, we would not be here without you. [applause] we would not
kennedy can be measured in no small part as a consequence of how we in america look at one another. how blacks look at whites, how gays looked straight, house traits lookit days. -- house streets look at today's -- how straights look at gays. and how we look at ourselves. when you were with him, you had to measure yourself against him. it always requires you to be larger than you were inclined to be. his death was not unlike his life. as we all know. overcoming pain and loss with a sense of dignity and pride that is amazing. he met his death in the same grave, generous terms that he lived his life. they could've been thinking about your father when he wrote, the will the fis fear when duty throws the gauntlet down the fate, when scorn compromises with death. this is heroism. your father was a historic figure. he was a heroic figure beyond that. i will remember and celebrate his life every single time i see a young, adolescent kids coping rather than cowering about having to make a decision about his sexuality. i will celebrate your father ever single time i see my granddaughter stand up
yesterday with apologies to those folks watching on c-span, but the only moral contented people in america then left-wing commager's on blogs or left wing collars -- are left wing coallers on washington journal. three weeks ago, nancy pelosi was blocking legislation would prohibit the fairness doctrine. who is the lead role in the senate, not barbara boxer, the other one feinstein did mention it. they're blocking republican attempts to shut it down while pointing people t the fcc to throw it back in. we have to be vigilant >> thank you, i live in a snake pit called new jersey have the time. part of the problem is that in new jersey, we have three republican congressmen that voted for capt. trade. i, being a lifelong republican and conservative feel like it is time to pull the plug on these people. [applause] if they're going to be supporting barack obama and the democrats, we do not need them. but when i talk to other republican people, they say that if we get rid of one, we will get another one so that i am in a dilemma about that. we have a man that is running for governor who, one week
. >> connecticut senator chris dodd. >> and john fitzgerald kennedy inspired america. robert kennedy challenged america. our teddy changed america. >> kennedy crossed the aisle to work with republicans, like his friend john mccain. >> a fight not joined was a fight not enjoyed. >> a video portrait of ted kennedy as the captain of the family's sailboat. >> ceylon, my friend. sail on. >> teddy has become a part of history. we have to do all the things he would have done for us, for each other, and for our country. ♪ >> tomorrow, the senator will be eulogized by president obama to whom kennedy said he was passing the torch. and at arlington national cemetery, kennedy will be buried next to his brothers. >> and of course you could what senator kennedy's funeral live right here on wbal at 10:00 tomorrow morning. at 5:30, nbc news will carry his burial live. his life, legacy, and the family dynasty is sunday morning at 10:00. a disturbing discovery inside a county home. 21 dogs found living in deplorable conditions on seabreeze drive in orchard beach. we have more with where the dogs were taken. >>
to the vfw on america's two foreign wars and the troops who are fighting them. you'll see it live right here in the "newsroom.." >>> two and a half months in the hurricane sen and bill and claude it light up the radar. hello, everyone. i'm kieyra phillips. you're live here in the "cnn newsroom." -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> and they fought for you. who fights for them. american veterans focused health care. we're pushing forward on both fronts. a live address to the vfw in this hour and a congressional session of conservative opponents to the health plan. you know we've covered their causes and criseses to tainted equipment at v.a. hospitals. there are people stories, not number stories. we can't ignore numbers like these. almost a million unprocessed claims. if claims are denied it can take a year and a half, sometimes much longer to go through the appeals. factor in a passionate fight to overhaul the nation's health care system and this becomes the scene outside president's adegree. cnn's ed henry joins me live. how does it push into this for reform? we sure know they want it.
of america's top enemies in afghanistan and pakistan. first, it is a "360" exclusive. in her first interview since her sister's return, lisa ling tonight joining us on "360" to talk about what's happened since her sister laura and her colleague, euna lee, came home from north korea. how they're re-adjusting and how euna's 4-year-old daughter hana is doing now that mommy is finally home. former president bill children securing their release. he spoke publicly about that trip for the first time today. but frankly, said very little. >> i wanted those young women to be able to come home. and i wanted our two countries to have the ability to decide where to go from here. it would be wrong for me to say any more. the young women can speak for themselves about their experiences. the pictures were worth a million words yesterday. i'm glad i could be of some help. >> pictures which seemed to capture the heart of a nation. since then, both families have been out of the public eye. tonight, though, lisa ling has been kind enough to give us a window into the moments since that plane touched down and som
questions. they may not be representative of america, but they are significant, and their views have to be taken into account. >> how are we supposed to trust you? i know that is a tough question, but i will make it easy. is there an option to say no to this bill? because it does not seem like you have said anything today. >> it is really not about health-care reform or about insurance reform. it is about government control. >> senator cardin, authority not given to you as a senator. greta: houston, texas, the congresswoman holds a town hall and actually answers herself on as a cancer survivor asks her a question. -- answers to cell phone as a cancer survivor after a question. -- answers her cell phone as a cancer survivor asks her a question. >> seriously. really, i mean, come on. >> you think this is good for america? when does it stop? greta: tracy miller asked that question, and she joins us. tracy, that video looks absolutely horrible. was there any explanation by the congressman about why that happened? >> i did talk to her later, but not about using the phone. her staff or hey
, interesting valuation, lacks catalysts. don't care for it here. bank of america, merrill lynch. they have a cell out. do they not understand the history of the company and how good you have it? >> jill, as you know, we're refocussed the company over the previous year and a half. in fact, we've been trying to innovate to help our customers succeed and our companies succeed. if you think about it, what we've been doing is positioning in the data and optical space which are growing and faster than the overall cap in the industry. and in particular, we're focused on the mobility space as well. you're right on target. when you had about it, there is a macro economic trend in the world. everyone around the world wants mobility and they want broad band. and we're focused on that mobility space. and right now, as you know, the phones are moving from just phone service, to mobile internet. then into mobile video. and we suspect over time, it will move into mobile commerce. and the u.s., for example, hasn't even started in that space yet. we're playing a big role there. >> when i look at what you'r
america." the head of the ntsb will be here with the latest on the investigation. that's this morning starting at 7:00. >>> we are following a developing story in iraq this morning where a devastating wave of bombings has left dozens dead. near the northern city of mosul two truck bombs targeted a shiite neighborhood. at least 25 people were killed and more than 70 hurt. and in baghdad, two car bombs targeting construction workers killed at least 16 people and left more than 80 injured. no group has claimed responsibility, but the attacks appear to be the work of al qaeda. >>> president obama is in guadalajara, mexico for a summit of north american leaders. topping the agenda is the growing health threat from the h1n1. emily schmichmidt joins us with preview. >> reporter: the next flu season is just around the corner. that's why today president obama will talk about how to fight the flu in the country where it began. president barack obama's summit with mexican and canadian leaders marks his first meeting with the united states' closest neighbors. that proximity means the h1n1 swine f
. this is a global franchise that should recover with the rest of the world, even if america lags behind. how about a fourth reason? it's getting out from under a ton of bad loans and doing it fast. it's going to be dividing the bank into citigroup holdings, no thank you, and citigroup proper. citigroup proper is 1/3 retail bank, 1/3 global services, 1/3 investment banking. all three are immensely profitable already. i think the split-off will do a lot to bring up the value. that's another way i'm going to get to my $6 target. reason number five, existing management. how about ned kelly? he's not going anywhere. he's staying put. the government would be absolutely nuts -- >> they know nothing, they know nothing, they know nothing! >> to remove either one of those guys as the turnaround is real and huge. and the books are clean. the bad stuff is going away. that's right. they're real and terrific, so to speak. all right. why the heck is the stock trading at $3? $3.80, how can that be? all right. well, first, the government's solution was terrible for existing shareplholders. i think we are recoverin
it as part of cspan's america and the courts saturday at 7:00, eastern. >> three days of peace, love, and music. 40 years ago this weekend, half a million people gathered for woodstock. saturday, the co-founder will take us behind the scenes. that will be at 9:00 p.m., eastern, on both tv. >> how is cspan funded? >> donations? >> federal funds, grant funds? >> maybe contributions. >> austin, i don't know. >> i would say from commercials. >> advertising? >> something from the government? >> 30 years ago, america pause cable companies created cspan as a public service. it is a private business initiative with no government mandate, no government money. >> while we wait for live coverage of the netroots convention in less than one hour, conversation with one of the conservative bloggers meeting in pittsburgh this weekend from this morning's " washington journal per-ql." host: tell us what you are representing. guest: i am here to talk about conservative activism on line and become larger participants. people across the country can act with one voice. host: we have been checking with rep
the worst run insurance companies in america. they predict he merged them they were poorly run and turn them into the biggest efficient. he is a doctor. he created the biggest insurance company in america for his shareholders. his stock went from nothing to being a very valuable. if you are a shareholder, you probably thought he got a lot of that out of nothing. he turned into an $80 billion company. it is nice to have shareholders who are mutual fund owners investing in united healthcare. he had a lot of stock in 1992. on paper, you can never defend anybody making a billion doctor -- dollars. it is very large, very comprehensive, and its shareholders were rewarded. it is like the government paid it. there are two sides to the story. . he created a massive company. he was in it very early. again, i'm not trying to defend him. certainly the taxpayers never paid united health care $1 billion. they are the single biggest contractor for medicare. they make on average about a 3.5% profit on their part d plan which is drugs and plan which is drugs and probably a 4% margin on their medicare advanta
? no, i have them. huh. the new lightweight hp mini netbook with windows and america's largest and most-reliable 3g network built in. only 199.99 with mobile broadband plans from 39.99 i am-- speechless, envious. wanna be me right now. getting one. sean: democrats claim all the americans protesting their health care bill are being organized by insurance companies. it looks like the party on the left is doing organizing of their own. george soros has pledged $5 billion million dollars left wing groups health care bill with a public option. speaker pelosi are all the people who organize things to soros contribututututututioutut >> leave us alone. that's all we would ask for. would you leave us alone? >> i'm sick of the lies. i don't like being lied to. i don't like being lied about. >> you have awakened the sleeping giant. >> amen. >> we are tired of this. this is why everybody in this room is so ticked off. >> we cannot afford, this period. keep the government out of it we're doing just fine. thank you, sir. sean: very powerful. more sights and sounds from senator specter's town hall me
optics straight to your home, for razor sharp tv, america's top rated internet-- now even faster, and crystal clear phone service. all for just... for 6 months. it's like getting 3 services for the price of 2. that's a $180 savings over six months for the best in home entertainment. don't miss this unbeatable value 3 great services, for the price of 2. call the verizon center for customers with disabilities at 800.974.6006 tty/v this if fios. this is big. >> we have some breaking news into the 11 newsroom. you are looking at live pictures of divers. a plane collided with a sightseeing helicopter. seven bodies have been pulled from the water so far including the helicopter. the melons governor's mansion is a bit greener tonight. other plant upgrades include energy efficient lighting and temperature controls. they have ramped up recycling, planted a vegetable garden, and it installed a new irrigation system that uses collected rainwater. >> score another head for cheap aspirin. it can help: cancer patient. they can benefit from taking aspirin along with the surgery and chemotherapy
pretty much 100% control of all information dissemination in america. now you have these tiny little breaches in the wall of sound with talk radio and the internet so what they want to do? shut them down. >> host: early one morning just been published you were being interviewed by howard smith on pbs and he said you talk about victims and dictum put in america but the more i listen to you i think that you are the one claiming victimhood, that you are the victim of the left-wing conspiracy and he held out his arms and said you should have across. what is howard smith struggling with? [laughter] .. how is chris werner going to get out there and heather macdonald? we have so many fantastic writers in new york, some and fantastic right wing writers and you are buying your head against the wall just to get attention for a book in even a best-selling book, even your seventh best-selling book when it's that hard for me to get on tv what does that say about the conservatives people love norma? >> host: others have said you try to be funny and he called a sophomoric sort of simplistic view of
or every industry across the country. the government has to be in there to keep corporate america honest? the steel industry, for example? you pick one and name one. the american people are saying we want health care reform. the republicans are saying we want health care reform, but we don't want a government takeover. we don't want socialized medicine and national health care. >> those words are frightening to a lot of people. let me ask you this about a moderate forum, what congressman cooper just mentioned. what do you think of a co-op? >> well, chris, i'm not sure we know what that co-op is. kent conrad has talked about it. all the machinations going on in the senate finance committee, it's all been kept close to the vest. i don't think the american people really know what this co-op would look like. i want to look at it closely. and certainly i will take -- just like senator shelby said on sunday, let's take a look at it and let's make sure. i think anything is better than this government option that's in there competing with an unfair advantage on an unequal playing field. >> let m
, in your face. welcome to town hall america. take a look at what happened when senator arlen specter held a town meeting today in lebanon, pennsylvania. >> you want to be let out of here, you're welcome to go. wait a minute. now, wait a minute. now, wait a minute. now, wait a minute. wait a minute. wait a minute. >> i have every right to -- >> wait a minute, wait a minute. he has a right to leave. >> wow. a similar scene played out later this afternoon when senator claire mccaskill held a town meeting in hillsboro, missouri. add in the protester with the gun strapped to his lower leg who showed up at a church near the town hall event that president obama held in portsmouth, new hampshire today. it's legal to carry the gun in that state, but this is what happens when the demagogues turn up the heat and the angry people come out in force. they start to tune in. that protester will be on the show to explain what he was doing with a gun near the president's meeting this afternoon. >>> also, ewe nice kennedy slifer, the sister of john f. kennedy died today. we will talk about the kennedys and
of dollars paid for in part by the pharmaceutical industry represent the kind of change america can believe in." david axlerod's son works there. steve: exactly. here's the thing about it. the $24 million to buy the ads, that is being bankrolled by the pharmaceutical industry. $24 million from the pharmaceutical industry, pumping into our tv and radio bloodstream and what not, and stuff like that. now, wait just a minute. didn't the pharmaceutical industry strike a backdoor deal with the obama administration regarding health care? oh, yeah. that's why a lot of people are going, hmm. however, the white house deny that axlerod is making any money on it. brian: did you see what bernie goldberg said last night? i thought it was a great point. remember everyone said -- critics. bush administration said, what is dick cheney doing? did he start that work so he could get his halliburton company, they used to be an executive, get all of those contracts to help rebuild iraq? people kept saying halliburton, look at dick cheney. maybe people thought halliburton was the best and only company that would
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